Posted tagged ‘content marketing strategy’

It’s Time to Tone Up Your Business (shameless promotional post)

May 2, 2013

Tuyb pic 1Small business owners face many challenges in these troubled economic times. Many entrepreneurs feel frustration about trying to find new customers and increase their revenues. Money management and growth are particularly challenging.

The Canadian Federation of Independent Business notes in its April, 2013, “Business Barometer” http://www.cfib-fcei.ca/cfib-documents/rr3289.pdf report that the overall business outlook across Canada “inched downward”. On a scale of 0 to 100, Ontario scored a 63.4, slightly above the national average of 62.4. According to CFIB, the norm is about 65 to 70 when the economy is in growth mode. Still, BMO reports in its 2013 Small Business Confidence Report http://newsroom.bmo.com/press-releases/2013-bmo-small-business-confidence-report-reveals–tsx-bmo-201304020863821001 that many businesses are optimistic that the economy will improve (34%), while the majority believes it will be unchanged  (50%) or worsen (16%). This is a bit more pessimistic than 2012.

The CBC featured a story recently, “10 Surprising Stats About Small Business in Canada”, that included a survey of small business owners and asked, among other questions, “What is your biggest challenge in running a small business?”

Here are the responses:

  • Cash flow – 51 %
  • Marketing – 21%
  • Work-leisure/Family – 18%
  • Managing staff – 10%

If you’re in the Ottawa area this month, you might want to consider attending the Tone Up Your Business event, taking place over the weekend of May 18-19. This series of workshops will radically transform how you approach all aspects of running and growing your company.  Our groundbreaking concept, drawing from facilitators in multiple disciplines and recently featured in Ottawa’s own Tone Magazine, offers a transformative, personal approach to success for today’s small business owner.

I will be facilitating a workshop covering the vast potential of blogging, content marketing, and ebook writing in the digital marketplace. It’s an ‘aha!’ moment when you suddenly realize that you can use your online presence as more than just a billboard or to share pictures; you can actually increase your revenues. If you’ve been using your website as a billboard and not making the best possible use of content marketing, you need to be at my workshop.

I’m proud to be a part of this event. I think you will start to look at your business in a completely different way afterward. Not only will you learn more about online marketing, but the other three workshop presenters are all innovators in their fields, and in helping small businesses succeed.

Heather Garrod, owner of Planet Botanix in downtown Ottawa and an influential member of the health and wellness community for many years, will teach techniques for finding lucrative opportunities through marketing, networking and event participation activities. “I think many people don’t realize that they can use the Big Three—Marketing, Tradeshows, and Networking—to leverage maximum potential for growth,” observes Garrod. “When they know the secrets, they can really jump-start their businesses.”

Trevour Strudwick, CEO of The Insight Studio, is a Corporate Trainer, Public Speaker, Motivational Coach and Occupational Hypnotist. “You will learn astonishingly simple, yet powerful techniques that will rapidly transform those internal barriers and limiting beliefs; namely, the fear of success, fear of failure and beliefs around the level of success you deserve,” promises Strudwick.

Attendees will also learn many exciting wealth creation and money management techniques from Business Consultant, Trainer, and Coach, Roy van der Mull, of VDMA Training and Consulting. “There is an art to making money, to keeping it and to allow it to grow,” says van der Mull. “Once you know the seasons of how money flows, it can only do one thing: flow towards you. It is not a secret, it is a matter of mind.”

As you can see, we will be covering the most important concerns expressed by small business owners and highlighted in the CBC story. If you’re looking for a way to kick-start your business, find new opportunities, and increase revenues, you definitely need to be there. In fact, you can’t afford not to be there.

More information and registration is available at www.insightstudiocanada.com. I hope to see you there!

Tone Magazine

Majority of Canadian Small Business Owners Are Still Living in the 1980s

March 25, 2013

Author: Brenna Pearce

I’m straying from small business blog writing advice in this post once again, but I thought the subject was important. I was doing some research for a presentation I’m giving about blogging for small businesses and I came across some interesting statistics I’d like to share with you. A recent (February 27, 2013) poll conducted by Ipsos Reid and commissioned by RBC, shows that the majority of small business owners in Canada are still living in the 1980s. Are you one of them? Read on.

Are You Missing a Major Marketing Opportunity?

The poll has some disturbing results; disturbing because so many companies are missing out on, and seemingly oblivious to, a major marketing opportunity. Among its results, the survey of small businesses in Canada showed that more than half of all small businesses in Canada have no dedicated website for their business. The poll doesn’t indicate if they have some other online presence, such as Facebook, which might be considered by some a dedicated website. My view is that a dedicated website would be a website exclusively owned by the company and hosted by some Internet hosting company. In other words, the company would have its own domain name and its website content would be created by, for, and about the company itself. Facebook wouldn’t qualify as a dedicated small business website by that definition.

English: A NES console with the Super Mario Br...

Living in the 1980s

So, the poll says, only 46% of Canadian small business owners have their own website. It’s no surprise then that 56% of business owners say that they believe finding and keeping customers is the biggest challenge they face in the coming year. Back in the 1980s the most common link to the outside world was the telephone. The most common way to market your business was through traditional advertising methods. Still, someone thought up the repugnant idea of using the telephone to market certain types of businesses and telemarketing was born. But again, this is still the marketing model for 54% of Canadian small businesses in 2013, 20+ years after the Internet Revolution began.

Is Your Website Just an Online Billboard?

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So, by now you’re thinking proudly to yourself, “I have a website for my small business”. Well, maybe you shouldn’t be so smug just yet. How are you using your small business website? Is it just an online billboard that features your products and services? Are you actively promoting your business online? In fact, only 41% of small business who actually have a website use it actively to promote their business, according to the poll. It isn’t enough just to have a website, you also have to make use of it to market your business.

According to Statistics Canada, 80% of the Canadian population is online. If you’re not trying to drive potential customers to your website, then what good is it? Recently I had a discussion with a new acquaintance about blogging. At one point he responded that he had an archive of articles on his website that he had written about his professional activities. Great, I asked; who’s reading them? How are people finding your articles? And how are people finding your website? By accident? By you directing them to your website when they come into your store or when you meet them at a networking function?

Create an Active Online Presence

Seriously, small business owners, it’s not enough just to hand out business cards with your website URL printed on them. You need to create an active online presence. How do you do that? One of the best ways, of course, is by blogging about your company, your industry, and the products and services that you sell.

My Cyber Social Map

While it is true that a blog eventually becomes a series of archived articles, writing a blog also needs to be an ongoing, dynamic process. Websites on their own are static rather than dynamic and plugged in to the daily digital Internet “news cycle”. A blog serves to keep your small business constantly connected to the worldwide online community. Each new subscriber is also a potential sharer of your information. Add the blog to Facebook and LinkedIn and you suddenly have access to all of the people you are connected to as you share each new blog post. They in turn may share your blog post to all of their friends. This is the organic nature of information-spread across the Internet. You in turn, need to visit bloggers’ sites similar to yours and post comments and share your website address. This gives you a very simple method of creating back-links, which is another way that Google uses your information to make you more visible in the search returns. Also, you create cross-links in each blog post that point to your other sites, such as your primary website and other social media websites, again creating interest from Google. Each blog post also needs to be created with SEO (Search Engine Optimization) in mind. The more relevant searchable terms you can add to your blog posts (without keyword stuffing which Google will ban you for), the more visible you will be in search returns. So you can essentially funnel new readers to your primary website.

Also keep in mind that a site like WordPress has almost 40 million users. You can “Press” each and every blog post and it is featured on the main news aggregator section of the WordPress site. That is a tremendous amount of new exposure for each and every blog article you post although, admittedly, only for a short period of time. Still, your blog posts also go into a classification category that indexes your blog site and makes it available for anyone interested in your information category. If you’re looking for worldwide exposure, this is certainly a fantastic way to get that. I have visitors on my blogs from all over the world.

It Doesn’t Have to Be Difficult!

Are you a small business owner still living in the 1980s? Still relying on telephones, newspaper ads, and other antiquated technology? Confused about how to turn your website from an online billboard hoping that someone might “drive by” on the Information Highway and see it, to a dynamic, vital part of a content marketing strategy that will bring in new business? Leave a message in the comments section below or visit our website; we can help you with all of that!

Finally, remember this sobering fact: of the 46% of Canadian small business owners from the RBC survey who had websites, 38% generate 25% to 50% of all their revenues from online activities. Can you afford to throw away that much business? If not, you should start thinking about creating a content marketing strategy.

Dollar Sign in Space - Illustration

7 Reasons You Don’t Need a Business Blog

December 3, 2012

Does Your Small Business Really Need a Blog?

It may seem a bit self-defeating for a blog about small business blogging from a company that offers small business blogging services to suggest your company may not need a blog, but that’s exactly what this post is about. There actually are some types of small businesses that don’t need a blog or at least would get less success from blogging than from other social media use. Some companies, especially some large corporations, have found more value in social media than in blogging. Much depends on your content marketing strategy, how you share content, and why you need to share content. It also depends on how much time, effort, and (sometimes) money you’re willing to invest in blog maintenance. For some entrepreneurs, starting out with social media platforms like Facebook might be a better option.

So here are seven reasons your company may not need a small business blog:

  1. You’d rather write about personal issues than create an online business persona
  2. You don’t have the time to maintain your blog
  3. You’re not willing (or can’t afford right now) to hire someone to do it for you if the above points apply
  4. Your industry is regulated and requires disclosure or compliance oversight
  5. You aren’t sure if you might accidentally or purposely libel someone or how your content might do that (see also point one)
  6. Your business requires interacting every day with its customers
  7. You require real-time feedback from your customers

1. In a previous article, we looked at vanity blogging. As a small business writer you need to detach your own personal outlook on life from your online business persona. According to last year’s State of the Blogosphere report from Technorati, 60% of all blogs belong to people who just want to express their opinions and speak their minds.

Image representing Technorati as depicted in C...

Their primary success measurement is personal satisfaction. Entrepreneurs, however, who make up about 13% of the blogosphere, blog to share information about their company and industry. Their primary purpose is to gain professional recognition and attract new customers.If this isn’t your primary purpose for blogging, you probably shouldn’t have a small business blog.

2. Blogging is hard work. It involves planning, research, good communications skills, creativity, a reasonable knowledge of SEO techniques, and general marketing know-how. You need to keep a regular schedule and provide content that makes sense and is valuable to the person reading it. If you’re not sure if you can commit to all of this, think twice about starting a business blog. At the very least, discuss some planning techniques with a professional.

3. Some entrepreneurs, especially small business owners, don’t really see the value of blogging and can’t imagine there’s any real ROI to it.

ROI Webinar

Yet they’re willing to plunk down hundreds or even thousands of dollars every year to post a business card-sized ad in a local newspaper.

An excellent blog written by a professional small business blogging service can give you far more ongoing exposure than a newspaper ad, and at a fraction of the cost. If the first two points apply to you and you’re not able to pay for a professional small business blogging service, then you might want to wait before starting a business blog.

4. Some industries are highly regulated (e.g. funeral homes, financial services companies, insurance companies, etc.). If yours is one, you may not be allowed to blog independently or at least not without the help of a lawyer. Given the compliance violation risks and higher costs involved, you likely don’t need a blog.

Gavel (PSF)

5. If you can’t hold your tongue (or rather your keyboard) and your temper, you probably don’t need a blog. There are real risks of libel when you’re writing content that’s freely available online. Trashing another company or blogging about an annoying customer, revealing another company’s trade secrets, and so on, can bring real, serious, legal consequences, not to mention permanently and irreparably damaging your reputation. Here’s one small business owner who lost her temper and went too far after a customer’s online review of her restaurant: www.cbc.ca. Bottom line: If you don’t understand the concept of libel, hire a professional or don’t blog.

6. Some companies will definitely get more value and customer engagement from social media platforms rather than blogging. A lively restaurant or nightclub might get more benefit from fast and responsive tweeting than from a blog, for example. Companies that specialize in content marketing through social media like Facebook, Twitter, etc., can help you get the most out of the high engagement interactions that these platforms offer. If you need rapid, high customer engagement, you probably don’t need a blog.

7. A related issue is companies who need fast turnaround time in their customer interactions. Some businesses can lose sales if their customers and the business owners don’t have information quickly enough, especially when selling solely online. If you need real-time interaction with customers, you probably need social media platforms more than you need a blog.

So clearly blogging isn’t for every small business. Now, to be sure, most of these points don’t represent reasons not to have a blog at all. You could very well use both blogging and social media in your content marketing efforts, with blogging playing a minor or secondary role. Social media platforms absolutely can be more effective (and safer) than blogs in certain circumstances.

The flip-side is that if you do have a blog and it’s not very well written or its irregular in terms of posting articles, you could actually end up doing more damage to your business reputation than good. People judge you and your business by the content you provide. You’re not trying to be Hemingway or Nietzsche, you’re just trying to be a good, solid, reliable source of information about your company and your industry. You don’t need to be profound, just memorable.

Have a question about small business blogging? Contact us or visit our website today!

10 Reasons Why Blogging Kicks Facebook’s Butt

November 26, 2012

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WordPress

It’s true. Blogging kicks Facebook’s butt. Here are ten reasons why.

  1. Facebook is passive, blogging is active
  2. Facebook is a sound bite
  3. Blogging is more search engine friendly
  4. Blogging is not intrusive
  5. Blogging gets people to visit your website
  6. Fans? Followers? Really? FB is really egocentric
  7. Blog posts are well-considered, FB posts can be knee-jerk and organically grow into disasters
  8. Blogging lets you develop a subject in-depth in a single post, be creative, expand people’s knowledge
  9. Blogging is more original, less cannibalistic
  10. Statistically, blogging generates more sales leads

1. Facebook is passive, blogging is active. Social media is often described as a “pull” marketing tactic, rather than a “push” tactic. Uh huh. Well, social media marketing folks, blogging can be both. With its ability to provide fuller detail and clearer, more informative content, blogging pulls people in and then pushes them to your website to learn more about your company.

2. Facebook is a sound bite. Using the analogy: “If FB and blogging were traditional media”, If FB and blogging were television, FB is a sound bite and blogging is a documentary. If FB and blogging were newspaper items, FB is a Personals ad, blogging is an Op-Ed piece. If FB and blogging were a radio program, FB is the commercial, blogging is the program. Clearly, bloggers (and their readers) have longer attention spans.

3. Blogging is search engine friendly. You can optimize your blog posts so that search engines “see” them and shine the spotlight on them. FB depends on “liking” and “sharing”. Let’s face it: if no one likes you and shares your FB stuff, you’re the invisible wallflower at the prom.

4. Blogging is not intrusive. FB follows you everywhere. FB wants to know what you’re doing every minute of every day. Further, a good blog article writer knows that people get fatigued if they post too often. Information overload is not a concept Facebook understands.

5. Blogging gets people to your website. Your blog just wants people to notice it and then look at your website. And maybe buy something from you. FB wants to sell you advertising so you get more “friends”. The Beatles said it best: Can’t buy me love. Not to mention that FB can just get too crowded. Ever commented on a FB post that had more than 10 comments already? How many people actually click on the “View all 220 comments” link?

6. Fans? Followers? Really? Facebooking is such an egocentric activity. My blog has a readership. FBers have fans and followers. Glass of Kool-Aid anyone?

7. Blogs are well considered, intellectual, and entertaining affairs. Or they should be. Sure, there are tons of really bad blogs out there, but a well-written blog does develop a dedicated, appreciative readership. Facebook users can turn on you and bite your hand in a heart-beat. Wal-Mart once had a difficult time with its Facebook page, due to negative comments from users.

8. Blogging lets you develop and expand any subject you’re writing about, in a single post. You can write in-depth, well written articles on your blog. This allows you to be creative and add to the general knowledge of your little portion of the Web. You can expand people’s understanding of your industry, your products and services, and your business. Facebook lets you “share” what others have written. Okay, to be fair, it lets you share what you have written, too. But does anyone “Like” it?

9. Blog articles are original. And if they’re not, they should be. Although there are many cannibalistic bloggers out there, eating other people’s material and regurgitating it as their own (some of whom get paid $4 per article for this activity), FB is almost purpose-built for cannibalism. Liking and sharing other people’s hard work, cannibalizing it for its own purposes, is a virtual way of life for Facebook.

10. Blogs generate more sales leads. It’s true. There are a number of studies out there that show blogging brings in more business than Facebook and other social media does. Here are a couple of studies from the Content Marketing Institute and Hubspot that you can look at (and there are others).

5 Simple Tips to Make Small Business Blogging Easy

November 20, 2012

"Black-white 2 Vista" icon theme

Writing a small business blog can be a challenge. These 5 simple tips will change your blogging life. Whether you’re just getting started or you’re starting to lose interest in writing your blog, here’s how to generate fresh new posts whenever you want.

5 Simple Tips

  1. Choose a theme
  2. Pick 3-5 topics about that theme
  3. Write down 5 or more points that you want to get across to readers for each topic (do them one at a time over several days or even weeks)
  4. Write a paragraph about each point
  5. Choose a title for your post

Polski: LOGO LAPTOP

1. Start With a Theme

One of the simplest ways to get going (or get going again) with your small business blog is to think of something you believe your customers would really like to know about your business, services, or products. For a start-up company that might mean picking a theme about how your business is unique when compared to competitors. For an established business you could choose a theme that you see repeated over and over again in customers’ questions. Your theme could be about a specific product or product line or a supplier you value or how one of your services is of great value to your customers.

Write down as many themes as you can think of. Brainstorm with other people, such as employees, friends, even Facebook fans. Ask them what subject themes they would like to read about.  Then write about them. Chances are if they want to read about certain subjects other people do too.

Let’s say I own a small DIY brewing company start-up where customers brew and bottle/can their own beer. For my first theme, I’ll choose brewing techniques. This is an important theme for my company because, well, that’s what we do here. I also come up with future themes: types and classifications of beers and ales, information about the brewing industry (history, latest trends), and so on. I have enough themes to write about now for at least three months ahead.

2. Pick a Few Topics

Once you have your theme,  choose 3-5 topics about that theme. Several topics allow you to create an informational series of articles. This helps to keep readers coming back for more information. You should space your topics out over a few weeks. So, if you picked four topics, you could space the series of articles out over a month (one a week).

For my DIY Brewing Company, I’ll pick the following topics:

  • Mixing the right mash
  • The fermentation process
  • Measuring specific gravity
  • Filtration

3. Make Notes for Each Topic

Pencil Icon

Now that you have decided on your topics you need to figure out what you want people to know about those topics. This could include “how-tos” for using a product, or interesting ways that people make use of a product, or why your company chose this product over hundreds of others available in the market, or how your industry is changing and you along with it. The point is to take a different approach from what others are writing about the product or are writing at similar companies about similar topics. You need to differentiate yourself from the herd, as with everything else you do when marketing your company.

For my “Mixing the Right Mash” topic, I’ll write about:

  • Types of mash
  • Pre-mixed mashes
  • Making your own mash
  • Choosing the right ingredients for your mash
  • Mashing tuns (about)

4. Write a Paragraph For Each Note

This might be the most difficult part of the entire blog post process. Blogging tips and techniques can only get you so far, after all. In the end, you’ll need to write a coherent paragraph about each note. You don’t need to limit yourself to one paragraph, though you probably should not write more than three, depending on the topic. Otherwise your post will become far too long.

I start my paragraph about “types of mash” like so: “As a beer brewing hobbyist, you have many different types of mash to choose from.” [Note that I didn’t self-promote by writing: “At DIY Brew we have many types of mash to choose from.” That sounds too much like a commercial and less like an informational article. Always try to write directly to the reader. Imagine that you’re speaking to one other person and instructing that person in a “how-to” manner.]

Then I would go on to list the different types of pre-mixed mashes, and introduce the topic of making your own mash for the next paragraph. Every paragraph should flow naturally into the next. The last sentence of your paragraph should be a natural cue for the first sentence of the next paragraph. For example, it would be more natural to go from “types of mash” to “pre-mixed” and “making your own” than it would be to start discussing mashing tuns (which is the equipment used for cooking the mash).

5. Choose a Title for Your Post

Choose a title that’s interesting and grabs a potential reader’s attention. “Mixing the Right Mash” might be a little dull for this title, but would do if you couldn’t think of something better. Something like “Choosing the Best Mash for the Best Results” might work better. People generally respond to “tips” titles, too (as in “5 Simple Tips to Make Small Business Blogging Easy”). Or you could be really inventive and work your topic points around  “M*A*S*H*” in the title; or maybe I’m just showing my age. You can also look  at my previous post, “12,000 Canadian Facebook Users Dead“, which is about how to spin a topic you’re writing about.

That’s it! It’s that simple. It’s a process and you just have to be methodical in your approach to this “chore”. You can probably see how you could use this process to easily plan an editorial calendar months in advance.

Please let me know if these tips have been helpful. Comment below or let us know on our Facebook page.

Entrepreneur or Provocateur? How to recognize when you’re writing a vanity blog, not a small business blog

November 19, 2012

(“Girl showing hearts on laptop”, Stuart Miles, http://www.freedigitalphotos.net)

What is a “Vanity Blog”?

Business owners who write on their company blogs about personal subjects not related to their business and its customers are what I call vanity bloggers. A small business owner who writes only to share cute personal stories, or share their personal philosophies and opinions is a vanity blogger. If you’re not using your valuable creative energies to promote your business and enhance your reputation as an expert in your industry in order to increase sales, you’re probably wasting your time blogging.

This may be an issue that has never occurred to some small business owners who blog. The subject relates back to my earlier post, “Batman’s Butler”, when I posed the question, “Why do we blog?”. The answer, you may remember, is that we want to communicate important information of value to other people. Unfortunately, we’re not always communicating the right kind of information as entrepreneurs. Instead, we may actually be impacting our readers negatively.

This concept cannot be emphasized enough: if you’re not writing for customers, you’re vanity blogging. Unless somebody knows you personally, they likely won’t give your vanity blog a second look. Why? First and foremost, you’re not offering them any useful information about your business. Second, and worse, you may be alienating potential customers because you’re sharing personal views about society, politics, etc., that they find disagreeable or even  offensive.

Write for the Right Audience

If you think you may be a vanity blogger, a good question to ask yourself is: who am I writing for? In other words, who is your audience? Are you writing for friends and relatives, or do you seriously want to find new customers? Most people who are curious enough about your company to check out your website and blog are so because you offer products and services that they need. If they are confronted with…

  • Your political views
  • Your religious beliefs
  • Your navel-gazing, personal confessions or other unsolicited revelations about your personal life
  • Puppies and kittens (unless related to your store mascot, animal welfare organizations you support or your pet store)
  • Your latest vacation
  • Anything else that is too personal

…your blog is likely doing little to support your company’s content marketing objective or generate new sales leads. In fact, it might be having the opposite effect.

Don’t Be Confrontational

Note the word “confrontational” above. To some people reading your blog for the first time your personal views may be confrontational. You wouldn’t greet a customer in your store by immediately broaching the subject of politics or religion, would you? Would you start telling them about your personal relationship issues? No.

The first thing you normally do after greeting a customer and a little chit-chat is ask something like, “What may I help you with today?” That’s the same attitude you should have toward your blog. How can you help the reader who is interested in your company and its products and services?

Take It Outside

If you have strong opinions you want to share about anything not to do with your company, your products and services, or your industry, consider starting a personal blog detached from your business. Whatever your opinions about non-business issues, no matter how profound or well-thought out, there will always be people who disagree, people who can’t get past your personal beliefs or opinions who might otherwise have done business with you. So take those opinions somewhere else, outside your company.

Of course, there may be people who agree with your views. Would you rather have 20 new customers who happen to agree with you on a personal level or 100 new customers by being neutral about everything except your own business? Remember that you’re trying to appeal to as many people as possible at the business level so they will buy from you.

Pet Peeve

I pick on puppies and kittens a lot when I’m writing about content marketing, but it’s for a reason. I personally have two dogs, and I love animals. But I would never blog about them or share photos of them (unless a number of readers specifically requested me to do that, of course) in my blog for the sake of having something to post.

Now, writing a one-off story about your cat isn’t going to kill your small business blog; likewise writing about a favourite animal welfare group. If that’s all you write about though, or you write too frequently about your pets, then you’re not helping to promote your business. In a sense, you’re only promoting yourself. If you’re a pet store owner, you’re excused from these guidelines (but even then posts about pets should be business-related).

You could certainly post occasional blurbs and pics of your pets on other social media platforms, such as Facebook. That’s really more the place for that type of material. Social media platforms are where you go to engage people on a more personal level with your business.

Vacations

This one could go either way. A post about your latest trip to the Mayan Riviera with pictures of you in swimwear strolling the pristine white sands along the beach or whooping it up at the hotel bar properly belongs on your personal blog or shared with friends on Facebook. However, a business-related trip to the Mayan Riviera where you attended interesting workshops or seminars is a perfect blog subject, so long as any posts you create are about what you learned and how you think this new information will benefit your customers. See the trend here?

Think Strategy, Think Sales

People blog for a lot of reasons. The only reason you should be blogging on your business website is because it’s part of your overall content marketing strategy. The information you share through your business activities, therefore, should be “strategic”. In other words, you’re blogging for customers, and if you’re not you should be. This is the only way your blog is going to generate increased sales revenues. And if you’re not sure how to do that, you’re reading the right blog.

 

 

Today’s Title: I wanted a title that reflects the dichotomy of today’s feature issue, that we can either write as entrepreneurs or simply write  articles that reflect our personal beliefs. Provocateur is more often used in the context of “agent provocateur”, one who incites others to commit illegal acts. I’m using the term provocateur to mean provoker, as in provoking our customers in negative ways. (Being provocative is not always a good thing.)

 

The Small Business Bloggers’ Blog, is written with the small business owner in mind. Remember: Small business blogs should be about the business and its customers, not about the owner.

Have a comment or question about small business blogging? Comment below or visit Pearce Enterprise Research on Facebook!

Use Your Business Plan to Create a Content Marketing Strategy

November 17, 2012

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Have you run out of ideas for blog posts on your small business blog? Did you start your blog with great enthusiasm then encounter writer’s block, wondering what to write about next? This is pretty common. Many entrepreneurs who started out full-steam ahead haven’t written a blog post for months and now wonder why they even have a blog in the first place.

Don’t despair and don’t give up just yet. There are strategies to overcome this situation. Short of hiring a small business blogging service, here are some tips that will help you to create a viable, long-term content marketing strategy for your business.

Mining for Content Gold: Revisit Your Business Plan

Many small business start-up owners have written a business plan prior to their opening day. Business plans are often compared to a road map of where the business will go over the near- and long-term life of the company. If you’re an entrepreneur thinking about creating your own small business blog, you’ll be pleased to know that some elements of your business plan can help you to work out a clearly-defined content marketing plan, too.

Good market research is one of the building blocks of a well-written business plan. It will help you better understand your industry, your competition, and your target market. That’s why the marketing section of your business plan is the perfect section to re-visit as you start thinking about your content marketing plan. This plan will include your blog, social media usage such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and so on, and any of the other ways that you share information valuable to potential and existing customers (e.g. newsletters, eBooks, etc.).

Five Short Steps to Blogging Success

Here are five steps you can take to get your content marketing plan working for your business:

  1. SWOT Analysis
  2. Position Yourself
  3. Stake Your Territorial Claim
  4. Create a Content Marketing Plan and Schedule
  5. Execute Your Content Marketing Plan

SWOT Analysis

A SWOT analysis is a good place to start. SWOT is an acronym for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats. You should have a clear idea in your mind of who your competitors are, whether you’re a start-up entrepreneur or a seasoned business owner. You have your strengths and weaknesses, and so do your competitors, whether in the form of the inventory you/they carry, your/their customer service, your/their marketing efforts, etc. You can exploit their weaknesses to strengthen your business, just as they can yours. Remember, you should look at local direct competition, local indirect competition, online direct competition, and online indirect competition, even if you’re a traditional brick-and-mortar retailer. You especially need to know what competitors are doing online to position themselves in your market.

In addition, you should be aware of a variety of opportunities and threats in your industry. Opportunities are things like new products coming to market that you can jump on, consumer buying trends that you can exploit, a local competitor business owner retiring or selling (e.g. this might mean that you could shift your products and services a bit to accommodate that business’s customer base), and so on. Threats could be anything from new government regulations (at all levels of government), a competing business opening up, a supplier going out of business, and above all, the activities of direct competitors.

The Microsoft Office website has a number of free SWOT analysis templates that you can try out or simply create the SWOT grid in a spreadsheet and fill it in. This is a good place to begin if you are in the start-up phase or you are already in business but you haven’t looked at your business plan for a while.

Once you understand your market and your competitors, you’ll be able to position yourself better in the marketplace and stake your territorial claim. How to do that in your particular industry is outside the scope and intent of this blog (however feel free to direct questions to our comments section or by email). Helping you to understand how your content marketing plan fits in with that positioning is our goal here.

Now that you know your business’s positioning in the market and have staked your claim, you can start to take it online in the form of content marketing. One place to start is simply telling potential customers about you and your business. You could answer the following questions that customers might have in your first blog posts:

  • Who are you?
  • Why should I trust you?
  • What products and services do you sell?
  • What is your customer service policy?
  • Why are you better than the guy down the street?

These are all questions most of us have asked when considering a new business, whether it’s retail shopping, eating at a restaurant, or even hiring a lawyer or realtor. Many customers want answers to these questions.

Of course, you need to make the answers seem like they’re not answers to questions at all. They should just come out “naturally” over the course of several articles. You’re writing blog articles that must be interesting and informative, after all. Simply writing a two paragraph blurb that amounts to, “I’m Jane Doe and I’ve been in this industry for 20 years and decided I want to have my own company”, really isn’t telling customers who you are or what your business ethos is or much of anything else. Be creative. Explain your passion for your industry. Get your customers excited about it, too.

Next, write to your position in the marketplace. Again, what specifically to write is your decision because you know your business and your market. Remember, though, that this generally means writing quality content that will get you recognized as an expert, because people who like it will share it with others. This sharing creates more and more traffic and makes it more likely that search engines will pick up your blog first. Sharing your own blog post links on social media sites like Facebook is also essential for visibility. To use that process most effectively, you may need to hire someone who specializes in that particular type of content marketing.

As to how to put together a sound content marketing plan and an editorial schedule for writing your small business blog posts, that is what this blog is about. In future posts, you’ll find creative ideas for blog posts for your business and details about how to put together an editorial schedule that will keep your blog interesting and constantly fresh. Please follow us to access the latest information.

The Small Business Blogger’s Blog is written with the small business owner in mind. Remember: Small business blogs should be about the business and its customers, not about the owner.

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