Posted tagged ‘blogging’

10 Reasons Why Blogging Kicks Facebook’s Butt

November 26, 2012

Italiano: versione ombreggiata e ingrandita de...

WordPress

It’s true. Blogging kicks Facebook’s butt. Here are ten reasons why.

  1. Facebook is passive, blogging is active
  2. Facebook is a sound bite
  3. Blogging is more search engine friendly
  4. Blogging is not intrusive
  5. Blogging gets people to visit your website
  6. Fans? Followers? Really? FB is really egocentric
  7. Blog posts are well-considered, FB posts can be knee-jerk and organically grow into disasters
  8. Blogging lets you develop a subject in-depth in a single post, be creative, expand people’s knowledge
  9. Blogging is more original, less cannibalistic
  10. Statistically, blogging generates more sales leads

1. Facebook is passive, blogging is active. Social media is often described as a “pull” marketing tactic, rather than a “push” tactic. Uh huh. Well, social media marketing folks, blogging can be both. With its ability to provide fuller detail and clearer, more informative content, blogging pulls people in and then pushes them to your website to learn more about your company.

2. Facebook is a sound bite. Using the analogy: “If FB and blogging were traditional media”, If FB and blogging were television, FB is a sound bite and blogging is a documentary. If FB and blogging were newspaper items, FB is a Personals ad, blogging is an Op-Ed piece. If FB and blogging were a radio program, FB is the commercial, blogging is the program. Clearly, bloggers (and their readers) have longer attention spans.

3. Blogging is search engine friendly. You can optimize your blog posts so that search engines “see” them and shine the spotlight on them. FB depends on “liking” and “sharing”. Let’s face it: if no one likes you and shares your FB stuff, you’re the invisible wallflower at the prom.

4. Blogging is not intrusive. FB follows you everywhere. FB wants to know what you’re doing every minute of every day. Further, a good blog article writer knows that people get fatigued if they post too often. Information overload is not a concept Facebook understands.

5. Blogging gets people to your website. Your blog just wants people to notice it and then look at your website. And maybe buy something from you. FB wants to sell you advertising so you get more “friends”. The Beatles said it best: Can’t buy me love. Not to mention that FB can just get too crowded. Ever commented on a FB post that had more than 10 comments already? How many people actually click on the “View all 220 comments” link?

6. Fans? Followers? Really? Facebooking is such an egocentric activity. My blog has a readership. FBers have fans and followers. Glass of Kool-Aid anyone?

7. Blogs are well considered, intellectual, and entertaining affairs. Or they should be. Sure, there are tons of really bad blogs out there, but a well-written blog does develop a dedicated, appreciative readership. Facebook users can turn on you and bite your hand in a heart-beat. Wal-Mart once had a difficult time with its Facebook page, due to negative comments from users.

8. Blogging lets you develop and expand any subject you’re writing about, in a single post. You can write in-depth, well written articles on your blog. This allows you to be creative and add to the general knowledge of your little portion of the Web. You can expand people’s understanding of your industry, your products and services, and your business. Facebook lets you “share” what others have written. Okay, to be fair, it lets you share what you have written, too. But does anyone “Like” it?

9. Blog articles are original. And if they’re not, they should be. Although there are many cannibalistic bloggers out there, eating other people’s material and regurgitating it as their own (some of whom get paid $4 per article for this activity), FB is almost purpose-built for cannibalism. Liking and sharing other people’s hard work, cannibalizing it for its own purposes, is a virtual way of life for Facebook.

10. Blogs generate more sales leads. It’s true. There are a number of studies out there that show blogging brings in more business than Facebook and other social media does. Here are a couple of studies from the Content Marketing Institute and Hubspot that you can look at (and there are others).

Advertisements

12,000 Canadian Facebook Users Dead

November 13, 2012

Facebook logo Español: Logotipo de Facebook Fr...

You’ve just been drawn in by a misleading headline. But don’t leave! Small business owners, read on. There’s a reason for this headline (and I promise not to do it again).

The Spin

This article probably isn’t what you expected when you first read the headline. You might have been thinking, “OMG, what happened?”, or something like that. In fact, my headline is like many online news article and blog headlines: misleading. The sole purpose of a skewed headline like this is to get your attention and pique your interest so that you will read the article.

You may already have guessed the spin behind this headline. In Canada Facebook has penetrated approximately 55% of the population (statistic from http://www.socialbakers.com). Assuming that, among the 22,500 Canadian deceased people ages 15-64 reported by Statistics Canada in their most recent report on deaths in Canada, we have the 55% Facebook penetration rate of the general population, then 12,340 people who died in 2009 may have had Facebook pages. So, 12,000 Canadian Facebook users are dead (although I’m playing a bit fast and loose with the statistics, I admit). I’m going to teach you in this blog post how not to create deceptive spin. And I’m going to show you how to make your blog post titles more engaging.

The Rationale

If you’re a small business owner with a blog, you do need to get the attention of potential customers. That starts with providing valuable and interesting information on your website and in your blog; but a big part of making that content appealing is picking the right headlines for your blog posts. And by the way, my Facebook-related headline here really is not appropriate for this article. This blog article is about creating engaging blog post titles, not about deceased Facebook users.

I could have called this blog post “How to Choose the Right Titles for Your Blog Posts”. Instead, I chose a dramatic, deliberately misleading title that at once shows how to and how not to choose a blog post title. It actually illustrates both main points of this article.

So how do you pick a good headline for your small business blog?

Wordle Cloud of the Internet Marketing Blog - ...

The Process

You might be tempted to start with a title and work backward from that to write the article. Generally, this is not a good idea because if you do that you’ll be limiting your creativity. You’ll find yourself stuck wondering how to write something that fits the title. Write your post first, look at it again, give it some dynamic spin if you can, then choose an engaging title that reflects the intent of your content.

But don’t take that last concept too far. One real danger is that you might choose a title that creates an expectation of the blog post content that disappoints your reader, just as I did with the title of this post. There likely will be many readers who come across this post title, click to read it, and then roll their eyes when they realize they’ve been misled. They hit the “Back” button and they’re gone, unlikely to return. That’s what could happen if you mislead readers by an overzealous spin on your title. There is good spin and there is bad spin. Spin is not about lying to your readers.

Initially, you will derive your headline from your editorial schedule and calendar. When you set up your content marketing editorial schedule (and you should already have done this), including planning related social media content posting, you first choose a theme for a series of posts. Then from that theme you drill down to specific subjects to write about and post online. However, it isn’t always enough simply to choose a subject summary as the title.

For example, let’s imagine that you’re a retailer selling widgets and you have just added the latest and greatest widget to your product line. You write an article about the benefits and advantages of these particular widgets over other, similar widgets. You could entitle the article “XYZ Company Adds New Widget to Product Line”, but that’s really not very exciting. “Big deal”, thinks the headline reader, who then yawns and clicks away from your website. So before that happens you need to start thinking about putting spin on the article before you post in order to make it more interesting to your readers.

Going back to our imaginary example, you suddenly remember a customer who had purchased one of your new widgets and took it with her on a recent vacation to Nepal. A good idea at this point would be to go back and do a bit of re-writing to focus more on the customer’s experience of the product. This is your spin.

Getting back to picking a good title, how about this: “Local Woman Takes XYZ Company Widget on Mount Everest Climb”. Although you probably won’t have too many customers who climb Mount Everest, the point is to think of more exciting ways to spin your articles. When your blog article includes information about your own customers using a product in interesting ways, potential customers visiting your website and blog for the first time are intrigued and want to learn more.

Mount Everest

Add a relevant image for greater effect

The example title above helps to raise questions in readers’ minds, such as:

  • “Who is this local woman climbing Mount Everest?”
  •  “Why did she take this company’s product with her?”
  • “Would I benefit from this product?”

Those questions might lead to thoughts like: “Maybe I should check out this company and this product.” That urge potentially leads to increased sales. And increased sales is the whole point of small business blogging. It’s a kind of intense advertising.

However, my perception is that many small business owners who already blog give very little thought to how their blog can generate additional sales, let alone to how the titles of their blog posts contribute to this. At best, they pick a humdrum, functional title that simply describes the subject they’re writing about. Often, this is simply because they don’t plan the article ahead of time. They write a blog post at the last minute and then neglect its title in their haste to get the article posted. But if you don’t engage your readers from the get-go your blog posts will go unread.

The Rules

The reason I chose this as my first subject for this blog is to start you thinking about the underlying concepts or “rules” of good small business blog writing. If you’ve already started writing your business blog and it isn’t producing any new sales leads, I encourage you to go back and take a second look at your existing posts. If you don’t have a business blog yet, then you’re already a step ahead by knowing how to encourage readers to look at your future posts.

Consider the following five general rules as you plan your blog posts and titles:

  1. Don’t mislead.
  2. Do find a fun, interesting, unique (honest) spin.
  3. Don’t “settle” for a mediocre title. Always remember, you’re trying to get new sales.
  4. Do make sure your content fulfills the reader’s expectations of the title.
  5. Do plan ahead so you have time to think about an interesting idea for every post.

Good blogging always includes well-considered post titles.  This comes from advance planning. Do start an editorial calendar and plan your themes and subjects ahead of time. We’ll explore how to do this in future posts, so please follow our blog to learn more.

The Small Business Bloggers’ Blog, is written with the small business owner in mind. Remember: Small business blogs should be about the business and its customers, not about the owner.

Visit Pearce Enterprise Research today to discover how we can help your small business blog generate new sales!